ACTIVITIES ARE BEING ORGANIZED AROUND THE WORLD — BY MILLIONS OF VICTIMS OF ELECTRONIC TORTURE

Activities are being organized around the world — by millions of victims of Electronic Torture — to inform the public that July 31 is “World Day Against Electronic Torture.” For the first time ever Professor Nils Melzer, UN Special Rapporteur on Torture, will present to the 75th UN General Assembly Session in October his report on “Cybertorture” which are Forms of Computerized Remote Electronic Torture against Illegally Targeted Individuals worldwide. This includes:

— Remote Electronic “Tagging” Of Innocent Victims By Brutally Assaulting Them Through Their Bodies And Into Their Neurological Systems with Microwave Pulses and Radiofrequency Signals Using Directed-Energy Weapons And Directional Antennas, In Order To Conduct Round-the-Clock Remote Electronic Surveillance Over Them — Often Illegal Forms Of Conducting Electronic Surveillance Over Innocent Civilians Through A Victim’s Body Performed By Corrupt Law Enforcement Officers With Microwave Weapons — In A Method Called “Remote Neural Monitoring”;

— Criminal Forms of Electronic “Mind Control” Experimentation To Manipulate The Victim’s Bodily Functions, Which Are Usually Directed From The Brain, Including Artificially Manipulating And Altering The Functions Of All The Body Systems, Such As: Motor, Digestive, Neurological, Circulatory, Evacuations Of Bladder And Bowel, etc.;

— Illegal Electronic Sending Of Subliminal Unwanted Messages (Voices Or Musical Themes For Psychological “Entrainment” — Which Are Forms Of “Brainwashing”), By Penetrating The Victim’s Auditory Cortex In The Back Of Their Head Right Into Their Brain By Means Of “Voice-to-Skull” (Patented) Technologies;

— Illegal Remote “Mind Reading” Experimentation which consists of Detecting Involuntary Movements Of Vocal Cords Subvocally (Patented), When The Victim Is Not Speaking But Thinking In Silence, So That An A.I. Computer Figures Out What The Victim Is Likely “Thinking About” By Analyzing Their Vocal Cord Movements, Including Their Very Private Mental Prayers; and many other Outrageous Criminally Dangerous Forms Of Illegal Experiments which are Currently Being Conducted Over Large Masses Of Defenseless Civilian Populations, Without The Victim’s Consent Which Is A Legal Requirement For Human Experimentation Under The U.S. Belmont Report For Human Subjects Experimentation

All The Above Atrocities And Human Rights Abuses Are Conducted In Total Violation Of All Victims’ Constitutional Rights, And In Violation Of The Human Rights And Fundamental Freedoms Of U.S. Citizens And Legal Residents, Aa Well As Of Millions Of Other Victims Worldwide. All The Above Is Conducted In Total Violation Of The Geneva Convention And Its Protocols Which Forbid Using The Above Weapons Of War — Which Have Been Internationally Classified as Weapons Of Mass Destruction (WMDs) — In War Crimes Over The Civilian Populations, Especially In Territories That Are Not At War. These Criminal Actions Also Violate The Nuremberg Code Which Forbids Abusive Human Experimentation.

THE UNITED NATIONS CONSIDERS THE CURRENT ACTS OF “CYBERTORTURE” OVER CIVILIAN POPULATIONS WORLDWIDE AS “A CRIME AGAINST HUMANITY.”

UN Starts Investigation to Ban Cyber Torture

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UN Starts Investigation to Ban Cyber Torture

Magnus Olsson, Geneva 8 March 2020                                                                                                

UN Human Rights Council (HRC) Special Rapporteur on torture revealed during the 43rd HRC that Cyber technology is not only used for internet and 5G. It is also used to target individuals remotely – through intimidation, harassment and public shaming. 

On the 28th of February in Geneva, Professor Nils Melzer, UN Special Rapporteur on Torture and other Cruel Inhuman Degrading Treatment and Punishment, has officially confirmed that cyber torture exists and investigation is now underway on how to tackle it legally.

Electromagnetic radiation, radar, and surveillance technology are used to transfer sounds and thoughts into people’s brain. UN started their investigation after receiving thousands of testimonies from so-called “targeted individuals” (TIs).

Professor Nils Melzer is an expert in international law and since 2016 he holds the Human Rights Chair at the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights. His team has found evidence that Cyber technology is used to inflict severe mental and physical sufferings.

“Judges think that physical torture is more serious than cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment,” he told the Guardian on 21 February. “Torture is simply the deliberate instrumentalization of pain and suffering.” These psychological torture methods are often used “to circumvent the ban on torture because they don’t leave any visible marks”. (1)

Cyber psychological systems like cognitive radio are used to interrupt human perceptions and memory. They can also be used to spy on people violating personal integrity which could lead to corruption and slavery in society. Cyber torture is also called no-touch torture or brain-machine interface.

One way to handle this situation is to regulate new technologies and use AI control mechanisms by independent and impartial investigators. The evidence gathered could then be used to convict criminals easier and quicker in the future.

Professor Meltzer and his team is now underway to create an international legal framework covering cyber technologies that can cause torture which previously was hard to prove. In the future it may be necessary to establish Radio Frequency Spectrum police in order to protect humanity from cyber terrorism. Nils Meltzer also revealed to me personally that the HRC will release several reports on this subject soon in the future.

  1. Owen Bowcott, ‘UN warns of rise of ‘cybertorture’ to bypass physical ban’ (The Guardian, March 2020)      https://www.theguardian.com/law/2020/feb/21/un-rapporteur-warns-of-rise-of-cybertorture-to-bypass-physical-ban?fbclid=IwAR0mIvFNEpODW8KspG0XulW8MqkmzSSiO2gskQOgHicfxRjCTgKWV3vjlh0

On February 28, 2020, the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture, Professor Nils Melzer, issued his World Report on “Torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.” This report included a definition of “Cybertorture,” the Crime Against Humanity where millions of targeted victims worldwide are remotely assaulted with Electromagnetic Weapons in actions directed via computer, often from Supercomputers.

(A/HRC/43/49) Cybertorture:

1. A particular area of concern, which does not appear to have received sufficient attention, is the possible use of various forms of information and communication technology (“cybertechnology”) for the purposes of torture. Although the promotion, protection and enjoyment of human rights on the internet has been repeatedly addressed by the Human Rights Council (A/HRC/32/L.20; A/HRC/38/L.10/Rev.1), torture has been understood primarily as a tool used to obstruct the exercise of the right to freedom of expression on the internet, and not as a violation of human rights that could be committed through the use of cybertechnology.

2. This seems surprising given that some of the characteristics of cyber-space make it an environment highly conducive to abuse and exploitation, most notably a vast power asymmetry, virtually guaranteed anonymity, and almost complete impunity. States, corporate actors and organized criminals not only have the capacity to conduct cyberoperations inflicting severe suffering on countless individuals, but may well decide to do so for any of the purposes of torture. It is therefore necessary to briefly explore, in a preliminary manner, the conceivability and basic contours of what could be described as “cybertorture”.

3. In practice, cybertechnology already plays the role of an “enabler” in the perpetration of both physical and psychological forms of torture, most notably through the collection and transmission of surveillance information and instructions to interrogators, through the dissemination of audio or video recordings of torture or murder for the purposes of intimidation, or even live streaming of child sexual abuse “on demand” of voyeuristic clients (A/HRC/28/56, para.71), and increasingly also through the remote control or manipulation of stun belts (A/72/178, para.51), medical implants and, conceivably, nanotechnological or neurotechnological devices.1 Cybertechnology can also be used to inflict, or contribute to, severe mental suffering while avoiding the conduit of the physical body, most notably through intimidation, harassment, surveillance, public shaming and defamation, as well as appropriation, deletion or manipulation of information.

4. The delivery of serious threats through anonymous phone calls has long been a widespread method of remotely inflicting fear. With the advent of the internet, State security services in particular have been reported to use cybertechnology, both in their own territory and abroad, for the systematic surveillance of a wide range of individuals and/or for direct interference with their unhindered access to cyber technology.2 Electronic communication services, social media platforms and search engines provide an ideal environment both for the anonymous delivery of targeted threats, sexual harassment and extortion and for the mass dissemination of intimidating, defamatory, degrading, deceptive or discriminatory narratives.

5. Individuals or groups systematically targeted by cybersurveillance and cyberharassment are generally left without any effective means of defence, escape, or self-protection and, at least in this respect, often find themselves in a situation of “powerlessness” comparable to physical custody. Depending on the circumstances, the physical absence and anonymity of the perpetrator may even exacerbate the victim’s emotions of helplessness, loss of control, and vulnerability, not unlike the stress-augmenting effect of blindfolding or hooding during physical torture. Likewise, the generalized shame inflicted by public exposure, defamation and degradation can be just as traumatic as direct humiliation by perpetrators in a closed environment.3 As various studies on cyber-bullying have shown, already harassment in comparatively limited environments can expose targeted individuals to extremely elevated and prolonged levels of anxiety, stress, social isolation and depression, and significantly increases the risk of suicide.4 Arguably, therefore, much more systematic, government-sponsored threats and harassment delivered through cybertechnologies not only entail a situation of effective powerlessness, but may well inflict levels of anxiety, stress, shame and guilt amounting to “severe mental suffering” as required for a finding of torture.5

6. More generally, in order to ensure the adequate implementation of the prohibition of torture and related legal obligations in present and future circumstances, its interpretation should evolve in line with new challenges and capabilities arising in relation to emerging technologies not only in cyberspace, but also in areas such as artificial intelligence, robotics, nanotechnology and neurotechnology, or pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences, including so-called “human enhancement”.

1. Al Elmondi, “Next-generation nonsurgical neurotechnology”, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, available at www.darpa.mil/p…/next-generation-nonsurgical-neurotechnology.

2 See Human Rights Council resolutions 32/13 and 38/7. See, most notably, the 2013 disclosures by Edward Snowden of the global surveillance activities conducted by the United States National Security Agency and its international partners, see Ewan Macaskill and Gabriel Dance, “NSA files: decoded – what the revelations mean for you”, The Guardian, 1 November 2013.

3 Pau Pérez-Sales, “Internet and torture” (forthcoming).

4 Ann John and others, “Self-harm, suicidal behaviours, and cyberbullying in children and young people: systematic review”, Journal of Medical Internet Research, vol. 20, No. 4 (2018); Rosario Ortega and others, “The emotional impact of bullying and cyberbullying on victims: a European cross-national study”, Aggressive Behavior, vol. 38, No. 5 (September/October 2012).

5 Samantha Newbery and Ali Dehghantanha, “A torture-free cyber space: a human right”, 2017.