We’ll be uploading our entire MINDS to computers by 2045

We’ll be uploading our entire MINDS to computers by 2045 and our bodies will  be replaced by machines within 90 years, Google expert claims

  • Ray Kurzweil,  director of engineering at Google,  believes we will be able to upload our entire brains to computers within the  next 32 years – an event known as singularity
  • Our ‘fragile’ human body parts will be  replaced by machines by the turn of the century
  • And if these predictions comes true, it  could make humans immortal

By  Victoria Woollaston

PUBLISHED: 14:22 GMT, 19  June 2013 |  UPDATED: 14:22 GMT, 19 June 2013

In just over 30 years, humans will be able to  upload their entire minds to computers and become digitally immortal – an event  called singularity – according to a futurist from Google.

Ray Kurzweil, director of engineering at  Google, also claims that the biological parts of our body will be replaced with  mechanical parts and this could happen as early as 2100.

Kurweil made the claims during his conference  speech at the Global Futures 2045 International Congress in New York at the  weekend.

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Ray Kurzweil - director of engineering at Google - claims that by 2045 humans will be able to upload their entire minds to computers and become digitally immortal - an event called singularityRay Kurzweil – director of engineering at Google –  claims that by 2045 humans will be able to upload their entire minds to  computers and become digitally immortal – an event called singularity. He made  the statement at the Global Futures 2045 International Congress in New York

WHAT IS  SINGULARITY?

Technological singularity is the development  of  ‘superintelligence’ brought about through the use of technology.

The first use of the term ‘singularity’ refer  to technological minds was by mathematician John von Neumann. Neumann in the  mid-1950s.

He said: ‘ever accelerating progress of  technology and changes in the mode of human life, which gives the appearance of  approaching some essential singularity in the history of the race beyond which  human affairs, as we know them, could not continue.’

The term was then used by science fiction  writer Vernor Vinge who believesbrain-computer interfaces are causes of the  singularity.

Ray Kurzweil cited von Neumann’s use of the  term in a foreword to von Neumann’s classic The Computer and the  Brain.

Kurzweil predicts the singularity to occur  around 2045 while Vinge predicts it will happen before  2030.

The conference was created by Russian  multimillionaire Dmitry Itskov and featured visonary talks about how the world  will look by 2045.

Kurzweil said: ‘Based on conservative  estimates of the amount of computation you need to functionally simulate a human  brain, we’ll be able to expand the scope  of our intelligence a  billion-fold.’

He referred to Moore’s Law that states the  power of computing doubles, on average, every two years quoting the developments  from genetic sequencing and 3D printing.

In Kurweil’s book, The Singularity Is Near,  he plots this development and journey towards singularity in a graph.

This singularity is also referred to as  digital immortality because brains and a person’s intelligence will be digitally  stored forever, even after they die.

He also added that this will be possible  through neural engineering and referenced the recent strides made towards  modeling the brain and technologies which can replace biological  functions.

Examples of such technology given  by LiveScience include the cochlear implant – an implant that is attached to the brain’s  cochlear nerve and electronically stimulates it to restore hearing to someone  who is deaf.

Other examples include technology that can  restore motor skills after the nervous system is damaged.

Also at the conference, Ray Kurzweil, pictured, said that 'frail, biological parts' of human bodies will be replaced with 'non-biological' parts in the future. Ray Kurzweil, pictured, said that ‘frail, biological parts’ of human bodies will be replaced with ‘non-biological’ parts in the future. He added that the non-biological part will become so powerful it can completely model and understand the biological part and make it redundant

Earlier this year, doctors from Cornell  University used 3D printing to create a prosthetic ear using cells of  cartilage.

A solid plastic mould was printed and then  filled with high-density collagen gel.The researchers then added cartilage cells  into the collagen matrix.

Kurweil was invited to the conference because  he has previously written books around the idea of singularity.

Expanding on this idea Martine Rothblatt, CEO  of biotech company United Therapeutics introduced the idea of  ‘mindclones’.

These are digital versions of humans  that  can live forever and can create ‘mindfiles’ that are a place to store aspects of  our personalities.

She said it would run on a kind of software  for consciousness and told The Huffington  Post: ‘The first company that  develops mindware will have  [as much success as] a thousand  Googles.’

Rothblatt added that the presence of mindware  could lead to replacing other parts of the body with ‘non-biological’ parts.

During Kurzweil's conference talk, and in his book The Singularity Is Near, he refers to Moore's Law of Computing, pictured.During Kurzweil’s conference talk, and in his book The  Singularity Is Near, he refers to Moore’s Law of Computing, pictured. The law  claims that the power of computing doubles, on average, every two years which  puts us on course for singularity by 2045

This is a concept that Kurweil also discussed  and was the basis of his book Fantastic Voyage.

In this book he discusses immortality and how  he believes the human body will develop.

He said: ‘We’re going to become increasingly  non-biological to the point where the non-biological part dominates and the  biological part is not important any more.

‘In fact the non-biological part – the  machine part – will be so powerful it can completely model and understand the  biological part. So even if that biological part went away it wouldn’t make any  difference.

DIGITAL AVATARS USED TO CURE  SCHIZOPHRENIA

An avatar system that can help schizophrenics  control the voices in their heads is being developed by British  researchers.

As part of the therapy, patients create an  avatar by choosing a face and a voice for the person, or persons, they believe  are inside their head.

Therapists can then encourage the patients to  oppose the avatar and force it away, which boosts their confidence in dealing  with their hallucinations.

The first stage in the therapy is for  the  patient to create a computer-based avatar, by choosing the face and  voice of  the entity they believe is talking to them.

The system then synchronises the  avatar’s  lips with its speech, enabling a therapist to speak to the  patient through the  avatar in real-time.

The therapist encourages the patient to  oppose the voice and gradually teaches them to take control of their  hallucinations.

The avatar doesn’t address the patients’  delusions directly but the study found the hallucinations improve as an  overall effect of the therapy.

This is because patients  can interact with the avatar as though it was a real person, because they  have  created it, but they know it cannot harm them.

comtermind

Many of the voices heard by schizophrenics  threaten to kill or harm them and their family.

‘We’ll also have non-biological bodies – we  can create bodies with nano technology, we can create virtual bodies and virtual  reality in which the virtual reality will be as realistic as the actual reality.

‘The virtual bodies will be as detailed and  convincing as real bodies.

‘We do need a body, our intelligence is  directed towards a body but it doesn’t have to be this frail, biological body  that is subject to all kinds of failure modes.

‘But I think we’ll have a choice of bodies,  we’ll certainly be routinely changing our parent body through virtual reality  and today you can have a different body in something like Second Life, but it’s  just a picture on the screen.

‘Research has shown that people actually  begin to subjectively identify with their avatar.

‘But in the future it’s not going to be a  little picture in a virtual environment you’re looking at. It will feel like  this is your body and you’re in that environment and your body is the virtual  body and it can be as realistic as real reality.

‘So we’ll be routinely able to change our  bodies very quickly as well as our environments. If we had radical life  extension only we would get profoundly bored and we would run out of thing to do  and new ideas.

‘In additional to radical life extension  we’re going to have radical life expansion.

‘We’re going to have million of virtual  environments to explore that we’re going to literally expand our brains – right  now we only have 300 million patterns organised in a grand hierarchy that we  create ourselves.

‘But we could make that 300 billion or 300  trillion. The last time we expanded it with the frontal cortex we created  language and art and science. Just think of the qualitative leaps we can’t even  imagine today when we expand our near cortex again.’

VIDEO: Ray Kurzweil – Immortality by 2045

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2344398/Google-futurist-claims-uploading-entire-MINDS-computers-2045-bodies-replaced-machines-90-years.html#ixzz2gTpgDHuH Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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Google’s chief engineer: People will soon upload their entire brains to computers

Google’s chief engineer: People will soon upload their entire brains to computers

 Published time: June 20, 2013 16:02

Ray Kurzweil (AFP Photo / Gabriel Bouys)
Ray Kurzweil (AFP Photo / Gabriel Bouys)    

There are around 377 million results on Google.com for the query “Can I live forever?” Ask that question to company’s top engineer, though, and you’re likely to hear an answer that’s much more concise.

  Simply put, Google’s Ray Kurzweil says immortality is only a few  years away. Digital immortality, at least.

minduploading

  Kurzweil, 64, was only brought on to Google late last year, but  that hasn’t stopped him from making headlines already. During a  conference in New York City last week, the company’s director of  engineering said that the growth of biotechnology is so quickly  paced that that he predicts our lives will be drastically  different in just a few decades.

  According to Kurzweil, humans will soon be able to upload their  entire brains onto computers. After then, other advancements  won’t be too far behind.

brain control

The life expectancy was 20, 1,000 years ago,” Kurzweil  said over the weekend at the Global Future 2045 World Congress in  New York City, CNBC’s Cadie Thompson reported. “We doubled it  in 200 years. This will go into high gear within 10 and 20 years  from now, probably less than 15, we will be reaching that tipping  point where we add more time than has gone by because of  scientific progress.”

Somewhere between 10 and 20 years, there is going to be  tremendous transformation of health and medicine,” he said.

  In his 2005 book “The Singularity Is Near,” Kurzweil predicted  that ongoing achievements in biotechnology would mean that by the  middle of the century, “humans will develop the means to  instantly create new portions of ourselves, either biological or  nonbiologicial,” so that people can have “a biological  body at one time and not at another, then have it again, then  change it.” He also said there will soon be   “software-based humans” who will “live out on the Web,  projecting bodies whenever they need or want them, including  holographically projected bodies, foglet-projected bodies and  physical bodies comprising nanobot swarms.”

  Those nanobot swarms might still be a bit away, but given the  vast capabilities already achieved since the publication of his  book, Kurzweil said in New York last week that more and more of  the human body will soon be synced up to computers, both for  backing up our thoughts and to help stay in good health.

  “There’s already fantastic therapies to overcome heart  disease, cancer and every other neurological disease based on  this idea of reprogramming the software,” Kurzweil at the  conference. “These are all examples of treating biology as  software. …These technologies will be a 1,000 times more  powerful than they were a decade ago. …These will be 1,000  times more powerful by the end of the decade. And a million times  more powerful in 20 years.”

  In “The Singularity Is Near,” Kurzweil acknowledged that Moore’s  Law of Computer suggests that the power of computer doubles, on  average, every two years. At that rate, he wrote, “We’re going  to become increasingly non-biological to the point where the  non-biological part dominates and the biological part is not  important anymore.”

  “Based on conservative estimates of the amount of computation  you need to functionally simulate a human brain, we’ll be able to  expand the scope of our intelligence a billion-fold,” The  Daily Mail quoted Kurzweil.

  Kurzweil joined Google in December 2012 and is a 1999 winner of  the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. In the 1970s,  Kurzweil was responsible for creating the first commercial  text-to-speech synthesizer.

Original:  http://rt.com/usa/google-kurzweil-singularity-brain-011/

CNN: Your Behavior Will Be Controlled by a Brain Chip!

CNN: Your Behavior Will Be Controlled by a Brain Chip

“Smart phone will be implanted”

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
October 9, 2012

A new CNN article predicts that within 25 years people will have embedded microchips within their brain that will allow their behavior to be controlled by a third party.

The story, entitled Smartphone of the future will be in your brain, offers a semi-satirical look at transhumanism and the idea of humans becoming part cyborg by having communications devices implanted in their body.

Predicting first the widespread popularity of wearable smartphones, already in production by Google, the article goes on to forecast how humans will communicate by the end of the century.

“Technology takes a huge leap in 25 years. Microchip can be installed directly in the user’s brain. Apple, along with a handful of companies, makes these chips. Thoughts connect instantly when people dial to “call” each other. But there’s one downside: “Advertisements” can occasionally control the user’s behavior because of an impossible-to-resolve glitch. If a user encounters this glitch — a 1 in a billion probability — every piece of data that his brain delivers is uploaded to companies’ servers so that they may “serve customers better.”

The tone of the CNN piece is somewhat sophomoric, but the notion that humans will eventually merge with machines as the realization of the technological singularity arrives is one shared by virtually all top futurists.

Indeed, people like inventor and futurist Ray Kurzweil don’t think we’ll have to wait 25 years to see smartphones implanted in the brain. He sees this coming to pass within just 20 years.

In his 1999 book The Age of Spiritual Machines, Kurzweil successfully predicted the arrival of the iPad, Kindle, iTunes, You Tube and on demand services like Netflix.

By 2019, Kurzweil forecasts that wearable smartphones will be all the rage and that by 2029, computers and cellphones will now be implanted in people’s eyes and ears, creating a “human underclass” that is viewed as backwards and unproductive because it refuses to acquiesce to the singularity.

Although the CNN piece doesn’t even foresee implantable brain chips until the end of the century, Kurzweil’s predictions are far beyond this. According to him, by 2099, the entire planet is run by artificially intelligent computer systems which are smarter than the entire human race combined – similar to the Skynet system fictionalized in the Terminator franchise.

Humans who have resisted altering themselves by becoming part-cyborg will be ostracized from society.

“Even among those human intelligences still using carbon-based neurons, there is ubiquitous use of neural implant technology, which provides enormous augmentation of human perceptual and cognitive abilities. Humans who do not utilize such implants are unable to meaningfully participate in dialogues with those who do,” writes Kurzweil.

Kurzweil’s forecasts are echoed by Sun Microsystems’ Bill Joy, who in a 2000 Wired Magazine article entitled Why The Future Doesn’t Need Us, predicted that technological advancements in robotics would render most humans obsolete.

As a result the elite, “may simply decide to exterminate the mass of humanity,” wrote Joy.

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Paul Joseph Watson is the editor and writer for Prison Planet.com. He is the author of Order Out Of Chaos. Watson is also a regular fill-in host for The Alex Jones Show and Infowars Nightly News.

Scientists: Humans and machines will merge in the future,,,

Scientists: Humans and machines will merge in the future!

By Lara Farrar
For CNN

July 15, 2008 — Updated 1317 GMT (2117 HKT)
 

LONDON, England (CNN) — A group of experts from around the world will hold a first of its kind conference on global catastrophic risks.

Some experts say humans will merge with machines before the end of this century.

They will discuss what should be done to prevent these risks from becoming realities that could lead to the end of human life on Earth as we know it.

Speakers at the four-day event at Oxford University in Britain will talk about topics including nuclear terrorism and what to do if a large asteroid were to be on a collision course with our planet.

On the final day of the Global Catastrophic Risk Conference, experts will focus on what could be the unintended consequences of new technologies, such as superintelligent machines that, if ill-conceived, might cause the demise of Homo sapiens.

“Any entity which is radically smarter than human beings would also be very powerful,” said Dr. Nick Bostrom, director of Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute, host of the symposium. “If we get something wrong, you could imagine the consequences would involve the extinction of the human species.”

Bostrom is a philosopher and a leading thinker of transhumanism, a movement that advocates not only the study of the potential threats and promises that future technologies could pose to human life but also the ways in which emergent technologies could be used to make the very act of living better.

“We want to preserve the best of what it is to be human and maybe even amplify that,” Bostrom said.

Transhumanists, according to Bostrom, anticipate an era in which biotechnology, molecular nanotechnologies, artificial intelligence and other new types of cognitive tools will be used to amplify our intellectual capacity, improve our physical capabilities and even enhance our emotional well-being.

The end result would be a new form of “posthuman” life with beings that possess qualities and skills so exceedingly advanced they no longer can be classified simply as humans.

“We will begin to use science and technology not just to manage the world around us but to manage our own human biology as well,” Bostrom said. “The changes will be faster and more profound than the very, very slow changes that would occur over tens of thousands of years as a result of natural selection and biological evolution.”

Bostrom declined to predict an exact time frame when this revolutionary biotechnological metamorphosis might occur. “Maybe it will take eight years or 200 years,” he said. “It is very hard to predict.”

Other experts are already getting ready for what they say could be a radical transformation of the human race in as little as two decades.

“This will happen faster than people realize,” said Dr. Ray Kurzweil, an inventor and futurist who calculates technology trends using what he calls the law of accelerating returns, a mathematical concept that measures the exponential growth of technological evolution.

In the 1980s, Kurzweil predicted that a tiny handheld device would be invented early in the 21st century, allowing blind people to read documents from anywhere at anytime; this year, such a device was publicly unveiled. He also anticipated the explosive growth of the Internet in the 1990s.

Now, Kurzweil is predicting the arrival of something called the Singularity, which he defines in his book on the subject as “the culmination of the merger of our biological thinking and existence with our technology, resulting in a world that is still human but that transcends our biological roots.”

“There will be no distinction, post-Singularity, between human and machine or between physical and virtual reality,” he writes.

Singularity will approach at an accelerating rate as human-created technologies become exponentially smaller and increasingly powerful and as fields such as biology and medicine are understood more and more in terms of information processes that can be simulated with computers.

By the 2030s, Kurzweil said, humans will become more non-biological than biological, capable of uploading our minds onto the Internet, living in various virtual worlds and even avoiding aging and evading death.

In the 2040s, Kurzweil predicts that non-biological intelligence will be billions of times better than the biological intelligence humans have today, possibly rendering our present brains obsolete.

“Our brains are a million times slower than electronics,” Kurzweil said. “We will increasingly become software entities if you go out enough decades.”

This movement towards the merger of man and machine, according to Kurzweil, is already starting to happen and is most visible in the field of biotechnology.

As scientists gain deeper insights into the genetic processes that underlie life, they are able to effectively reprogram human biology through the development of new forms of gene therapies and medications capable of turning on or off enzymes and RNA interference, or gene silencing.

“Biology and health and medicine used to be hit or miss,” Kurzweil sad. “It wasn’t based on any coherent theory about how it works.”

The emerging biotechnology revolution will lead to at least a thousand new drugs that could do anything from slow down the process of aging to reverse the onset of diseases, like heart disease and cancer, Kurzweil said.

By 2020, Kurzweil predicts a second revolution in the area of nanotechnology. According to his calculations, it is already showing signs of exponential growth as scientists begin to test first generation nanobots that can cure Type 1 diabetes in rats or heal spinal cord injuries in mice.

One scientist is developing something called a respirocyte, a robotic red blood cell that, if injected into the bloodstream, would allow humans to do an Olympic sprint for 15 minutes without taking a breath or sit at the bottom of a swimming pool for hours at a time.

Other researchers are developing nanoparticles that can locate tumors and one day even eradicate them.

And some Parkinson’s patients now have pea-sized computers implanted in their brains that replace neurons destroyed by the disease; new software can be downloaded to the mini computers from outside the human body.

“Nanotechnology will not just be used to reprogram but to transcend biology and go beyond its limitations by merging with non-biological systems,” Kurzweil said. “If we rebuild biological systems with nanotechnology, we can go beyond its limits.”

The final revolution leading to the advent of Singularity will be the creation of artificial intelligence, or superintelligence, which, according to Kurzweil, could be capable of solving many of our biggest threats, like environmental destruction, poverty and disease.

“A more intelligent process will inherently outcompete one that is less intelligent, making intelligence the most powerful force in the universe,” Kurzweil writes.

Yet the invention of so many high-powered technologies and the possibility of merging these new technologies with humans may pose both peril and promise for the future of mankind.

“I think there are grave dangers,” Kurzweil said. “Technology has always been a double-edged sword.”

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